30 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. RSF is concerned by the appointment of Eddie Cheung as the head of Radio Television Hong Kong

      RSF dissaproves the decision Eddie Cheung’s appointment as the head of Radio Televison Hong Kong (RTHK). He was a former territory’s representative to the European Union, known for his involvement in a smear campaign against international media. He is filling the role of another political commissar, Patrick Li, who was also a bureaucrat without previous media experience, with a strong pro-Beijing commitment.

      While serving as the Special Representative for Hong Kong Economic and Trade Affairs to the EU, he signed about 58 public letters in which he accused some of major European media of ‘unfounded allegations’ on Hong Kong’s policies.

      RSF revealed the systematic censorship and information control by the Chinese regime in Mainland China and Hong Kong in their report titled The Great Leap Backwards of Journalism in China. The analysis showed that these actions pose a great threat to press freedom and democracy on a global level.

      While once being an example of well implemented press freedom, Hong Kong had a downfall from 80th in 2021 to 148th this year according to the RSF World Press Freedom Index.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Finland parliament’s website hit by DDoS launched by Russian hackers

      Yesterday, the external websites of the Finnish parliament were inaccessible for a couple of hours due to a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack launched by pro-Russian hackers. They explained the reason for this attack as a response to Finland’s aspiration towards joining NATO. This hacker group called NoName057(16) took the responsibility for the attack on their Telegram channel.

      In the post, the hackers said that ‘We decided to pay a ‘friendly’ visit to neighboring Finland, whose authorities are so eager to join NATO.’ The DDoS attack happened on the same day US president Joe Biden signed ratification documents regarding Washington’s support for Finland and Sweden joining NATO.

      The Finnish parliament replied to this event with this statement: ‘A denial-of-service attack is directed against the Parliament’s external websites. […] The Parliament takes steps to limit the attack together with service providers and the Cybersecurity Center.’

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Since the fall of Kabul Afghanistan suffers from a serious lack of press freedom and women journalists are impacted the most

      Since the fall of Kabul and the creation of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, the impact on media is unquestionable. During the past year, journalism in Afghanistan has been decimated. RSF secretary-general Christophe Deloire emphasizes: ‘Media and journalists are being subjected to iniquitous regulations that restrict media freedom and open the way to repression and persecution. The authorities must undertake to end the violence and harassment inflicted on media workers, and must allow them to do their job unmolested.’

      When it comes to the slaughtering of press freedom in Afghanistan, women journalists are subjected to it the most. According to RSF’s survey, in the past year, they disappeared in 11 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces. Out of 2,756 women journalists and media workers who were employed in 2021, only 656 are working today. This downfall resulted in the percentage of 76.19% of women journalists who are no longer working in their homeland. Statistically, 84.6% of female media workers are working in the Kabul region, while recently women TV presenters were being made to cover their faces while presenting on camera. The excuses for harassing female workers are primarily accusations of ‘immorality or conduct contrary to society’s values.’

      The overall statistical report on press freedom in Afghanistan shows that both men and women have lost their jobs since the regime change. 7098 journalists are no longer employed which includes 54.52% of men. The number of media outlets also dropped, with 39.59% of them lost.

      This media situation is a reflection of Taliban governance, with the impact of the draconian regulations and the inability to respect Afghanistan’s press freedom law.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. RSF warns of violence against Iraqi reporters during protests

      Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is warning of and condemning the harassing of opposition media in Iraqi Kurdistan. RSF’s Middle East desk said that the brutality against journalists shows a complete refusal for toleration of political pluralism and a desire to suppress this popular protest.

      The violence is used as a tool for dispersing not only protesters, but also the journalists who cover it. RSF has gained the information from Metro Center, an NGO that defends journalists’ rights in Iraqi Kurdistan, that there are a total of 78 violations against 60 journalists, including searching, detaintment, prevention from covering protests, and equipment confiscation.

      These protests are called by the New Generation leader, Shaswar Abdalwahid in order to demand elections and to denounce “corruption, poverty and unemployment.” Consequently, out of the 26 journalists who were detained shortly, at least ten work for NRT, a TV channel owned by Abdalwahid.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

  2. Aug 2022
    1. Belarusian journalists face threats in a repressive regime

      Since Alexander Lukashenko’s controversial reelection in August 2020, Belarusian journalists have faced various threats, which forced them to adapt in order not to be silenced.

      RSF’s partner, the Belarusian Association of Journalists (BAJ), noted that around 400 journalists have fled to neighboring countries, such as Poland, Ukraine, and Lithuania. The ones who stayed in their homeland, face difficulties on a regular basis, using the encrypting messaging app Telegram as a main tool.

      Starting from 2020 the Belarusian authorities have changed certain laws to the extent of legally infringing freedom of the press. Living in this atmosphere, Belarusian journalists have been the subjects of around 500 arrests, fines, censorship, threats, searches, prison sentences, mistreatment, torture, and reprisals against loved ones, as RSF states. Even exiled journalists live in fear of being kidnapped, thus deciding to work anonymously.

      RSF is giving Belarus 153rd place out of 180 countries in their 2022 World Press Freedom Index.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. RSF welcomes a series of presidential pardons in Egypt with the warning about more than 20 journalists are still detained

      RSF is praising the release of seven prisoners in Egypt at the end of last month. Nevertheless, these releases come as a government’s part of a five-year ‘National Strategy for Human Rights’ started in September 2021. Its aim is to promote reforms that should result in an increase of freedoms for Egyptians, including press freedom. The United States is donating Egypt $1.3 billion in military aid each year and another $130 million is conditioned on respect and implementation of human rights, thus encouraging the Egyptian government to give presidential pardons.

      RSF notes that despite these releases, around 20 journalists are still in jail. Some of them are the bloggers “Mohamed Oxygen” and Alaa Abdel Fattah, a freelance photographer Alia Awad, and four Al Jazeera journalists – Rabie El-Sheikh, Ahmed El-Nagdy, Bahaa Ed-Din Ibrahim, and Hesham Abdel Aziz. Fattah and several of his fellow detainees were even considering ‘group suicide’ as they were not on the list of pardoned prisoners.

      Al-Manassa, an independent Egyptian news website, has been inaccessible in Egypt since last month, while more than 500 other websites have been blocked from online access since 2017, which includes the RSF.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Five years since the launching of the U.S. Press Freedom Tracker

      Five years ago, on this day, the United States have launched the U.S. Press Freedom Tracker, a joint project of the Press Foundation and the Committee to Protect Journalists.

      In six years of documentation, this database for press freedom violations in the United States has documented nearly 1000 assaults of journalists and 300 arrests od detainments, above 50 border stops and 250 reports of damaged equipment. More than 100 analyses regarding press freedom issues were published.

      This year, the site went through a major redesign. It has new data visualization capabilities and increased speeds for downloading data. The Traker gives both live view of aggression against the media while capturing trends over time. That is how the Tracker can give information that by the time the former president Trump was banned from Twitter, he posted 2520 tweets degrading journalists and the media.

      With Tracker as a press freedom watchdog, state of press freedom in the U.S. will be monitored and served more easily in the future.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Iraqi journalists were attacked by security while covering Baghdad protests

      On July 30, three journalists who work for the privately owned Al-Mayadeen news broadcaster were attacked and injured during protests in Baghdad’sn Green Zone by supporters of Iraqi Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, according to Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) information.

      Flash-bang grenades were thrown by the security forces and they hit Al-Mayadeen’s videographer Zaid Khaled Jomaa and Baghdad bureau chief and reporter Abdulah Badran. The third victim of the attacks was videographer Abdullah Saad who was shoved to the ground by riot police officers, being left with injured leg and ankle.

      CPJ’s Middle East and North Africa senior researcher, Justin Shilad, alarms that Iraqi authorities must protect journalists that are covering protest and allow them to report about political situation in Iraq freely and safely. He also noted that Iraqi journalists are doing essential work in life threatening circumstances in order to inform the public, thus authorities need to provide them work without fear.

      CPJ has received information that the three journalists often face risks when they report and Iraqi security forces regularly fail to differentiate protesters from journalists. The Iraqi Ministry of Interior had no comment on CPJ’s email.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Several Taiwanese government websites hit with cyberattack on the eve of Pelosi’s visit

      A couple of hours before U.S. House Speaker, Nancy Pelosi was expected to visit Taiwan, several Taiwanese government websites were down.

      This cyberattack was reported shortly before Pelosi’s plan to visit Taiwan, with its controversial relations with China, claiming it as its own. Therefore, the Chinese government threatened to act if the visit happens.

      On Tuesday evening, the official websites of Taiwan’s government and its presidential office were blocked from use. It was confirmed by the office spokesperson that the president’s site was hit by an overseas malware attack. It was restored after 20 minutes.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Man with rifle arrested near Iranian-American journalist’s home

      An Iranian-American journalist and women's rights activist, Masih Alinejad, was a potential target to a man who was found near her home in New York with a loaded rifle. Fortunately, he was arrested and Alinejad expressed her shock to learn what happened.

      She is known for promoting videos of women violating Iran’s head covering law to her millions of social media followers. It was said that the same journalist was a target of a Tehran-backed kidnapping plot last year. What she had to say about this to Reuters was: ‘What the Iranian regime did, first trying to kidnap me and now sending someone here trying to kill me, it's a pattern. It's a continuation of their way of oppressing dissidents inside and outside Iran...I'm not scared of them and I'm going to continue my fight against gender apartheid. Because I didn't do anything wrong, I'm not a criminal, my crime is just giving voice to voiceless people.’

      Tehran has dismissed all allegations of involvement in the kidnapping.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. UNICEF’s new analysis: ‘Protecting Children in Cyberconflicts’

      In this rapid analysis, UNICEF made 5 important questions: How are AI technologies and the use of cyber operations changing the nature of conflict? Who are the actors in cyberconflict? What types of risks do offensive cyber operations pose to children? What legal and other provisions exist to protect children from harm caused by cyberconflict and where are the gaps? What should organizations working for and with children do to strengthen protections in cyberconflict? The ones we will focus on in this update are the last three questions. Firstly, it is important to focus on question number 3 - What types of risks do offensive cyber operations pose to children? As UNICEF experts highlighted the most important ones are:

      Behavioral surveillance, profiling, and targeting of children during conflict operations. Behavioral engineering as a potential pathway to child recruitment into and use by armed forces and non-state armed groups. Information operations and their impact on children. Health and biotech sectors. Education sector (‘Large-scale, multi-vector attacks could increasingly infect myriad layers of schools’ digital systems…’). Critical industrial control systems in urban environments. Cyber threats to humanitarian datasets and services critical to child well-being and protection.

      Question number 4 focuses on - What legal and other provisions exist to protect children from harm caused by cyberconflict and where are the gaps? UNICEF notes that attributing responsibility for child rights violations while protecting sensitive information from digital manipulation and theft is crucial. ‘Many analysts would argue that the combination of IHL, international criminal law, human rights law, and child rights law are adequate to address the emerging issues posed by cyberconflict and the technology it involves. Nevertheless, several key challenges persist.’

      Question number 5 - What should organizations working for and with children do to strengthen protection in cyberconflict? It is necessary to engage with normative policy development processes. UNICEF sees OEWG (Open-Ended Working Group) as an important platform for dialogue for States to develop norms to strengthen children's rights protection from cyber attacks. It is important to further strengthen understanding of the potential risks to children of cyberconflict as well. What also is an obligation of States is the reinforcement of normative and legal frameworks to strengthen child protection during cyberconflict and translating them into action. The last two that were mentioned were the strengthening of monitoring and investigation mechanisms and defining corporate responsibility in cyberconflict.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Australian reporter left Afghanistan after Taliban forced her to withdraw reports on forced marriages

      Lynne O’Donnell, an Australian journalist for Foreign Policy Magazine, said this week that the Taliban threatened to put her in jail if she did not withdraw stories criticizing the organization.

      She spent several years in Afghanistan as a resident correspondent before the U.S. retreated her from the country last year. She then returned within the last week to report on the Taliban practices of forced marriages with teenage girls.

      After writing some tweets and articles about the topic, Taliban officials started to pressure O’Donnell, influencing what she wrote. She stated that the tweets written on Tuesday were made by the Taliban: ‘l apologize for 3 or 4 reports written by me accusing the present authorities of forcefully marrying teenage girls and using teenage girls as sexual slaves by Taliban commanders. This was a premeditated attempt at character assassination and an affront to Afghan culture.’

      The concerned journalist left Afghanistan after these happenings, claiming it was inevitable: “If I did not, they said, they’d send me to jail. At one point, they surrounded me and demanded I accompany them to prison. Throughout, a man with a gun was never far away.”

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

  3. Jul 2022
    1. Saudi prince’s meeting with Macron despite Khashoggi murder and imprisonment of 27 journalists

      The meeting between the French president Emmanuel Macron and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is supposed to be held tomorrow in Paris on 28 July. What seems to be the concern of RSF (Reporters Without Borders) is that 4 years passed since journalist Jamal Khashoggi was murdered. 27 journalists and bloggers are currently detained in Saudi Arabia, thus RSF asks Macron to negotiate with Mohammed bin Salman to release them.

      It is worrying that the prince of Saudi Arabia is engaging in international relations promoting truth and justice. The involvement of Mohammed bin Salman in Khashoggi’s murder has been confirmed by the UN special rapporteur Agnès Callamard and a CIA report in 2021.

      RSF put the Saudi Arabian prince on their list of predators of press freedom, due to waves of arrests of journalists starting from his appointment in 2017 and his brutal response to the freedom of speech.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Frequent violence against media in Greece

      In the past three years, there were 11 attacks against Greek journalists and media accused of spreading government propaganda. The latest attack was on a building in Athens that houses Real FM news radio and the weekly RealNews on 13 July. An anarchist group calling themselves ‘Thousands of Night Suns’ confirmed the involvement on 20 July, dedicating this attack to two anarchist activists, and blaming Real for supporting political propaganda.

      It is crucial that the Greek government speeds up the implementation of the interministerial memo on journalists’ safety and the European Commission’s September 2021 recommendations. Despite what Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis says about the need for conviction of perpetrators, most attacks on press freedom remain unpunished.

      Journalists in Greece are not exposed only to violent attacks of this kind, being a target of organised crime. That is why Greece is placed the lowest in RSF’s 2022 World Press Freedom Index out of all EU countries, being 108th out of 180.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Intensification of cyberwar between Iran and Israel

      Three of Iran's state-owned biggest steel companies stopped working after facing cyberattacks in late June. These biggest steel companies were attacked by a hacking group who admitted it on social media as a response to ‘the aggression of the Islamic Republic.’

      After that, Israel’s defense secretary ordered an investigation into the leaked video which showed the damage to the steel plants. This incident was soon followed by the Israeli Security Agency’s statement (Shin Bet) that a May cyber operation by Iran was set to be out of the cyber domain . With these two incidents, it is clear that the cyber conflict between these two countries has become more public in the previous 2 years.

      Israel and Iran shifted to a public forum and their objective has changed from defense targets to violating critical infrastructure and civilian lives. With larger public exposure, the greater the risks of extending beyond cyberspace with the influence of other areas of this conflict as well.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Yurii Shchyhol warns of a new ongoing World Cyber War

      Yurii Shchyhol, the head of the Ukrainian State Service of Special Communications and Information Protection, warns there might be an ongoing World Cyber War since the start of Russia’s invasion. Russian cyberespionage and cyberattacks since 24 February weren’t targeted only at Ukraine. Their intervention has been recorded in 42 countries across six continents, mostly from NATO and countries which supported Ukraine during this period.

      Shchyhol has stated for Politico that the world has been awakened and that countries are more willing to intensely cooperate with each other on these issues. He also advised: ‘But what we need are not further sanctions and further efforts to curb cyberattacks, we also need for global security companies to leave the market of the Russian Federation. Only then can we ensure the victory will be ours, especially in cyberspace.’

      In this interview, it was said that there is strong assistance from the U.S. Cyber Command and the National Security Agency as all of Russia's attacks are ‘an ongoing, continuous war, including the war in cyberspace.’ What Shchyhol also warns us is that despite the two-month stagnation of Russian cyber attacks, what they’re doing is just a part of their tactic in order to collect resources for another attack - which will likely be on a global level.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Russian journalists’ union close to being disbanded

      The Russian prosecutor’s office brought on a 350-page complaint against the independent Journalists’ and Media Workers’ Union (JMWU), to disband it. The union learned about the complaint on 13 July. The complaint proposes that some of the employees are foreign agents while some were accused of systematically harming the state and society with their actions.

      The reasons behind the complaint are mainly due to the fact that the JMWU publicly opposed the war in Ukraine, defended Russian journalists who were prosecuted, and criticized media censorship in their country. They also signed the ‘Perugia Declaration for Ukraine’, which confirmed their support for Ukrainian journalists.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. India's Supreme court ordered releasing of a journalist over a controversial tweet

      An Indian journalist, Mohammed Zubair, has been given the release on bail over the accusations of a “highly provocative” tweet in 2018, by India's Supreme Court. The tweet was supposedly aimed at straining ties between Hindus and Muslims. Regardless of the accusations, the tweet itself had no evidence of causing harm to the religious sentiment of Hindus.

      When he was granted bail, the court said that keeping Zubair in custody had no legal power. As a vocal critic of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Zubair and his colleagues accused the federal government of giving the police orders in silencing journalists and critics undermining the freedom of the press and speech.

      In this atmosphere, it is important to note that India is ranked 150th on the 180-country World Press Freedom Index.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Myanmar freelancer sentenced to three-years of jail by the state military court

      Nyein Nyein Aye, a Myanmar freelancer and journalist, was sentenced to a three-year prison sentence for the spread of ‘false news.’ She was also accused of causing fear and agitating crimes against a government employee. While Nyein worked for various media outlets, one of them: Mizzima News, was banned by the junta.

      Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk implied that this arrest is followed by the big wave of arrests of journalists after the February 2021 coup. He also noted that these sentences behind closed doors by military courts are similar to a factory production line. RSF’s press freedom barometer shows that she is the 24th journalist to receive a prison sentence out of the 67 media workers currently held in Myanmar’s prisons.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Biden’s message at the Arab summit on freedom of the press and democratic rights

      U.S. president Joe Biden said in his speech at the Arab summit in Saudi Arabia that the United States will keep its close partnership with the Middle East while urging leaders who attended the summit to advance human rights as a powerful source of economic and social changes. With that being said, freedom of the press and democratic rights are highlighted. He urged the necessity of releasing journalists.

      Biden sent a message to the leaders saying: ‘Accountable, accountable institutions that are free from corruption and act transparently and respect the rule of law are the best way to deliver growth, respond to people's needs, and I believe ensure justice.’

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Pakistani reporters are being harassed by the government army

      Since Shehbaz Sharif took over as a Pakistani prime minister in April, there have been a dozen reports of army-related agencies harassing the media, as RSF cautioned. Critical journalists have been a target of a major army campaign to intimidate their work, parallelly destabilizing Pakistan’s democracy.

      This serious decline in press freedom was bolstered with the latest case on 9 July when BOL news anchor, Sami Ibrahim, got attacked by three people. The next day, he posted a YouTube video, saying that the attack was planned to prevent him from filming the scene, and the attackers later left in a vehicle with clear signs of being state-owned.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Cyberwar games: Cyber Europe 2022

      One of the largest cyber crisis simulations organised by The European Union Agency for Cybersecurity (ENISA) has just been completed. With over 800 cybersecurity experts from 29 European countries and the European Free Trade Area (EFTA), it involved specialists from EU agencies and institutions as well.

      This year, the exercises involved a scenario of a simulated attack on European healthcare infrastructure and they tested how participants’ respond to incidents in coordination with EU institutions. They involve the ability of close work with CERT-EU and ENISA in order to reinforce the resilience of the healthcare sector against cyber attacks in the EU with complex business continuity and crisis management situations.

      These lessons will be published in ENISA’s ‘after-action report.’

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Costa Rica's public health system hit by Hive ransomware

      The Costa Rican Social Security Fund (CCSS), i.e. Costa Rica’s public health service was hit by Hive ransomware and forced to shut its systems down. The ransomware was deployed on at least 30 out of 1,500 government servers, CCSS told local media.

      Cybersecurity experts suggested that Hive might be working with Conti to help Conti rebrand.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Italian police thwart Eurovision cyberattack by pro-Russian hacker groups

      Italian police thwarted hacker attacks by pro-Russian hacker groups Killnet and Legion during the 10 May semi-final and 14 May final of the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC) in Turin, Italy. Russia was excluded from the competition due to what it calls its special military operation in Ukraine, while Ukraine went on to win the contest.

      Killnet denied the attack on ESC, but then declared cyberwar on 10 countries in the same Telegram post. In a separate video, the group stated that these 10 countries are ‘the US, the UK, Germany, Italy, Latvia, Romania, Lithuania, Estonia, Poland, and Ukraine.’

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. OEWG agrees on modalities of stakeholder participation

      The OEWG reached agreement to apply modalities for the participation of stakeholders as proposed by the Chair on 20 April, through a silent procedure. NGOs both with and without ECOSOC status should inform the OEWG Secretariat of their interest to participate. If no state raises an objection to the Chair, NGOs will be invited to participate as observers in the formal sessions, make oral statements during a dedicated stakeholder session, and submit written inputs to be posted on the OEWG’s website. The modalities will be read out at the OEWG’s third substantive session for the formal record.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Five Eyes authorities issue warning against Russia-backed cyberattacks on critical infrastructure

      We’ve reported before that US authorities have been warning against imminent cyberattacks from Russia. This time, it’s the cybersecurity authorities from the Five Eyes – Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK, plus the USA – who are warning of the risk that cyberattacks are being planned against critical infrastructures in Ukraine and beyond.

      The warning comes in a joint cybersecurity advisory, which refers to US intelligence that the Russian government may be exploring options for potential cyberattacks.

      The advisory also notes that cybercrime groups that have recently publicly pledged support for the Russian government ‘have threatened to conduct cyber operations in retaliation for perceived cyber offensives against the Russian government or the Russian people.’ The same threat exists for countries and organisations helping Ukraine.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. DDoS attack takes Israeli government websites down

      Several government websites in Israel – including the websites of the ministries of interior, defence, and justice – were unavailable for over an hour on 14 March. The incident was caused by a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack against a communications provider, according to the country’s National Cyber Directorate. Access to the affected websites was restored later in the day.

      No statements were made regarding attribution of the attack, although some media sources pointed to a possible Iranian involvement.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Digital Security Lab launching

      Reporters Without Borders (RWB) is an international non-profit public interest organization in France which has defended the promotion of freedom of information since 1985.

      On 18 July, RWB will present its newly founded Digital Security Lab: a digital forensic laboratory that will help combat the threats of online surveillance. Based in Berlin, the Digital Security Lab is designed to analyze the devices of journalists who suspect they are under any digital surveillance. Journalists are a target of many threats that can affect their devices or personal social accounts for malicious reasons. This requires a rigorous and united response, and that is why any journalist will be able to contact the Digital Security Lab if they suspect they are the target of digital espionage because of their work.

      Journalists often receive sophisticated phishing messages, and Digital Security Lab experts will search for clues with the analysis of suspicious messages to find out if they are for sent spying purposes. The team will also examine installed programmes and will check for other data traces that might offer traces about previous activities and spying technologies.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Turkish court jails 16 Kurdish journalists over alleged terrorist links

      A Turkish court has jailed 16 Kurdish journalists for "belonging to a terrorist organisation" and their close cooperation with the pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) in Diyarbarkir. They were also accused of spreading terrorist propaganda and since 2016 several hundred HDP members have already been detained. Nazim Bilgin, the president of the Journalists' Association of Turkey warns that: "We are living in the darkest days of our country as far as press freedom is concerned." It is also alarming that Turkey has jailed more reporters than most other countries in the previous decade, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL

    1. Relatives of Al Jazeera reporter Shireen Abu Akleh accused the U.S. of trying to erase Israel’s responsibility for her death

      Relatives of Al Jazeera reporter Shireen Abu Akleh, who was killed while covering an Israeli raid in the occupied West Bank in May, showed their deep disappointment in President Joe Biden in a letter released over his administration’s response to her death.

      They accused the U.S. of trying to deny Israel’s responsibility for her death, saying in an official statement that Israeli fire most likely killed her but that the May 11 shooting in the West Bank was an accident. The family sent a request to Biden for meeting with them when he visits the region, which The White House declined to comment on, alongside with the matters of the letter.

      Palestinian eyewitnesses who claimed they saw she was shot by Israeli forces gained support from a reconstruction made by The Associated Press, investigations by CNN, New York Times, and The Washington Post as well as monitoring by the U.N. human rights office.

    Created with Sketch. Visit annotations in context

    Created with Sketch. Tags

    Created with Sketch. Annotators

    Created with Sketch. URL