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  1. Feb 2021
    1. The Prehistoric Period—or when there was human life before records documented human activity—roughly dates from 2.5 million years ago to 1,200 B.C.

      timing of prehistoric age

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    1. This article questions one of corner stones of Hobbesian political science and international relations. Namely, this corner stone often quotes early humansas aggressive and conflict-prone. They quote hunter societies. But this article and interview of Frans de Waal shows opposite. Humans are equally prone for cooperation and conflicts. It is not their nature but social and cultural context that creates basis for conflict of cooperation. It is also my personal experience form former Yugoslavia. The same people who were 'brothers' turns into enemies as political and social framework changed. It was not about their 'nature' but social context.

      ||minam||

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    1. Jared Diamond's book The World Until Yesterday

      Useful resource. I will consult it.

      ||minam||

    2. My answer was influenced by David Graeber's book "Debt: The Last 5000 Years", and others like Kropotkin's "Mutual Aid"

      For resoruce page

      ||minam||

    3. Exchange of gifts (e.g trinkets, livestock)- Tribal elders meeting and engaging in rituals (religious or hierarchical)- Exchanging of hostages/slaves, or more rarely intermarrying- understandings/disputes focusing around hunting rights, water sources, etc

      Main types of exchanges

    4. Aboriginal diplomacy before and after western contacts would be very interesting to me. contacts with tribes in the Amazon give ideas of hunter-gatherer diplomacy.

      Interesting to include

      ||minam||

    5. The earliest state I know of is Egypt potentially founded by the Scorpion King. Chinese culture is begun around the same time, as well as the Harappans in India, and the Sumerians around the Tigris and Euphrates.

      to consider these parallel processes

    6. That's diplomacy based on emotion. adoration and idolisaton. I think the rationalization followed that. Real bureaucracy and thus diplomacy didn't really exist until the written word existed for trade and defensive pacts between kingdoms. You may have had some verbal agreements before that but likely it was always the kings or leaders who met, knowing that any breach of trust must have come from them, as a middle man could have lied, been blackmailed or saw an opportunity to influence events. Once the written word and the seal exists, you can do work on behalf of the leader and easier send commands and shape a kingdom.

      good point.

    7. Tristes Tropiques, Claude Lévi-Strauss mentions a tribe preparing and transporting gifts to another tribe.

      to add to resources and find some basic elements

      ||minam||

    8. The Moors, in Cordoba and Grenada,

      Good to include Moors in summary

      ||minam||

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    1. The Creation of Writing: Interview with Dr. Jennifer Ross

      Here is Summerian myth which is interesting since it links writing to 'diplomacy'. Here is the sequence explaining the first recorded text on writing https://youtu.be/M8gONI_YH7c?t=2675

      ||minam|| We may call Jennifer Ross to speak next week

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    1. ||minam|| have a look what is the bet feature to engate with h-diplo

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    1. ||minam|| Let us engage H-Diplo community through this announcement page.

      Someting like this (please draft)

      Over the next 11 months we will have Historical Journey on Diplomacy and Technology. The main aim is to anchor current debates on AI and digital in the wider context of humanity dealing with new technology since writings till today. The main audience are practicising diplomats and diplomatic academic institutions.

      On this journey we will also explore evolution of technique of diplomacy from representation to negotiations.

      One of the aim is to shead more light on non-western traditions in diplomacy and technology.

      As you can see from the website the journey started with interview with Frans de Waal on early traces on diplomacy among primates. On 2X february we will focus on diplomacy in prehistory. March will focus on ancient diplomacy and so on till we come to our time.

      Please let us know if you would like to contribute via interviews or webinar discussions. Your advices will be particularly useful in pointing to new angles for addressing diplomacy-tech interplay or useful literature and resources.

      The results of this journey will be shared as creative commons for teaching and research purposes.

      Inspired by Churchill;s saying that '... ' we hope to contribute a bit to the current 'axial time' in history of humanity when rules for our AI and digital future are set.

      Here you can find more info on this journey: https://www.diplomacy.edu/diplomacy-and-technology

      With best regards,

      Jovan Kurbalija, Phd xxx xxx

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    1. Erik Gilbert and Jonathan T. Reynolds. "Africa in World History: From Prehistory to the Present". Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2004. 416 pp. Maps, illustrations, index. $42.00 (paper), ISBN 0-13-092907-7.

      Add to Journey's overall literature. We can use it also for engaging African scholars.

      ||minam||

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    1. His son and successor, Amenhotep IV, more commonly known as Akhenaton, was a religious reformer who fought the power of the Amon priesthood. His only military significance was to let the imperial possessions slip away, thereby setting the stage for the more dynamic foreign and military affairs of the Nineteenth Dynasty.

      Akhenaton was a great reformer but not good for strategic position of Egyptian empire. He lost many territories.

    2. While Amenhotep III ruled peacefully from 1386-1349 B.C., the Hittites had been establishing control over Syria and threatening Egypt's position in Palestine. His success in maintaining the balance of power among Egypt's neighbors was solely due to diplomacy.

      a great diplomat

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    1. The digital realm, with its extreme impermanence and selectiveness of personal agency and not natural forces, leads to the question as to what we are leaving to future professional historians and whether they will experience more difficulty in reconstructing anything about our time.

      Key quesiton for our journey:

      what we are going to pass to next generations?

    2. that leather and paper from that time have entirely disappeared (unless found in a desert or recopied for generations) remind the reader of the perishable nature of communication that has been increasing from that time into our own.

      key aspect for general series and real question for our era.

    3. Karen Radner, Michael Jursa, and the well-known and prolific Amelie Khurt.

      ||minam|| please have a look if we can make interview with some of them in March. Maybe this Amelie Khurt. You can draft e-mail which I can send to first her and others if she does not reply.

    4. emphasizes the role and training of scribes in both the royal and vassal courts

      diplomatic training

    5. This enables the Mesopotamian historian, or any for that matter, to observe that despite the changes of regime over the course of Mesopotamian history, communication networks (means of dispersing messages), methods of writing, and format of these messages appear to have remained consistent and with very little change, yielding great utility to diplomacy and governance.

      Continuity in Mesopotamian diplomacy

    6. Karen Radner, ed. State Correspondence in the Ancient World: From New Kingdom Egypt to the Roman Empire. Oxford Studies in Early Empires Series. Oxford Oxford University Press, 2013. Illustrations, charts, graphs. 322 pp. $74.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-0-19-935477-1.

      ||minam|| please add to resoruces for the session on ancient diplomacy.

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    1. Experiment by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Indonesia on the development of a machine learning visualisation tool - aimed to facilitate dialogue with foreign governments & other stakeholders.

      To note that this project started after a seminar on Digital Diplomacy which DiploFoundation was part of.

      ||JovanK|| ||JovanNj|| ||djordjej||

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  2. Jan 2021
  3. Nov 2020
    1. operating in the world as it exists, has been scrupulously building a government-in-waiting. And in the two days since a Trump-appointee allowed the formal transition to begin, Biden's team has begun to examine the rusted nuts and bolts of the beleaguered institutions he will inherit.

      ||NatasaPerucica|| Natasa, this para is related to yesterday's discussion on the future diplomacy.

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    1. Summary of document

      • the main aim of a Technology Alliance is to counter fast tech growth of China; document contains detailed analysis of China's policies and approaches.
      • it focuses on supply chains (||VladaR||: potentially relevant for Geneva Dialogue; multilateral export control; new investement mechanisms ( ||TerezaHorejsova|| for various Geneva initiatives); standards (for Geneva-project).
      • Technology Alliance has a strong value-basis: promotion of democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights.
      • 10 members are 'in'; others are considered; major dilemma is how to bring India in the Alliance.
      • risk of China taking western technologies via a few weak points: informal scientific/academic cooperation (||kat_hone|| this could be a reason for growing focus on new science diplomacy; Taiwan's semi-conductor industry which is easily accessed by Chinese tech companies and researchers.
      • how to define critical technologies among members of Alliance?
      • high relevance of digital standards, mentioning Geneva's organisation, and suggesting practical steps (e.g. funding delegations for standardisation bodies).
      • growing importance of open source solution + decoupling hardware from software as a way to counter-balance Huawei's lead in the field of 5G.

      ||NatasaPerucica||||StephanieBP||||Katarina_An||||AndrijanaG||

    1. A U.S. Diplomatic Service for the 21st Century

      ||Jovan||

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    1. To analyse renewing of USA diplomacy: 'Revitalizing the State Department and American Diplomacy'

      ||Jovan||

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    1. Two new reports, one from the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), a think-tank, the other the result of an extensive project at Harvard University, offer thoughts.

      ||NatasaPerucica|| ||Katarina_An|| Could you find these reports (send links)?

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    1. ▪Statute 7: “ThePrinciple of Freedom and Responsibility in Science: the free and responsible practice of science is fundamental to scientific advancement and human and environmental well-being. Such practice, in all its aspects, requires freedom of movement, association, expression and communication for scientists, as well as equitable access to data, information, and other resources for research.

      Statute 7 of the International Science Council

  4. Sep 2020
    1. But Zoom diplomacy can be just another dividing line between the haves and have-nots: Countries that can’t If your country lacks the funds for elaborate system of embassies or diplomatic travel are likely to have subpar broadband and 5G connections, too.

      parallel with digital divide (zoom and capital diplomacy)

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  5. Aug 2020
    1. Under this method, draft resolutions are circulated by the President of the General Assembly, which gives Member States a deadline of at least 72 hours, to raise objections. If there are no objections, the President circulates a letter, confirming that the resolution has been adopted.

      Explanation of 'silent procedure' which is increasingly used in diplomacy to accelerate decision making. It creates more dynamics in policy making.

      Kath, we can include growing importance of 'silent procedure' as a way to accelerate diplomacy. I can double check - but I think that it is practice developed in the EU which is now extended by the UN.

      ||TerezaHorejsova|| ||kat_hone||

    2. The same procedure will apply for a series of special high-level sessions scheduled to take place, including a commemoration of the landmark 75th anniversary of the United Nations; a summit on biodiversity; and a meeting to commemorate, and promote, the International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons.

      In summary for the FF you can also include some of official info what will be held in hybrid way (online + in situ).

      ||TerezaHorejsova||

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    1. This article is particularly relevant for Kath's project on post-COVID diplomacy. It provides realistic analysis of challenges in diplomacy.

      Author argues that COVID-19 changes, including growing relevance of digital diplomacy, are here to stay.

      The most important insight is that shift towards new diplomacy will be driven by financial pressure on ministries of foreign affairs triggered by pandemic financial crisis and possibility to do diplomacy 'differently' (online). In democratic countries, this pressure will come from parliaments and general public that have been always suspicious of diplomacy as elitist profession.

      Another important point is about growing control of politicians over foreign policy and diplomacy.

      ||kat_hone||||VladaR||||Jovan||||NatasaPerucica||||Katarina_An||

    2. With inevitably tighter budgets, foreign ministries will face some tough choices over the coming years.

      Financial pressure will be stronger on diplomatic services. They will be asked why they use resources to have people in embassies while they can use online meetings as they did during COVID-19 crisis.

      ||kat_hone||

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    1. Nicholas Burns, an ex-ambassador tonatonow running a project on the futureof American diplomacy at Harvard (theproject is non-partisan but Mr Burns is anadviser to Joe Biden), believes it is time to“ring the village bell”

      We should check about this project.

      ||TerezaHorejsova||

    2. More than two dozen govern-ment agencies now have people overseas,eroding the State Department’s primacy.Nowadays, the boss of a global Americancompany may have a one-on-one with ahead of state without going through theembassy,

      two reasons of the decline of the US diplomacy

    3. The dereliction of diplomacy

      decline of the US diplomacy ||Jovan||

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    1. "encouraged to move all side events to virtual platforms to limit the footprint and number of people in the U.N. building."

      Preparations for UN 75

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  6. Jun 2020